SPEAKERS

Controlling Unresponsive Chronic Migraine

David Dodick, MD

David Dodick, MD

Director of Headache Program

Mayo Clinic

Day 7

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What makes chronic migraine a different beast to episodic migraine?
  • What is central sensitization and how does it relate to chronic and episodic migraine?
  • How do you treat someone who says they have already tried everything?
  • How do you treat someone who is never pain-free?
  • What are the risk factors that lead people to develop chronic migraine?
  • Why do some people recover from chronic migraine spontaneously?
  • What types of migraine get better with age?
  • Why do some people’s chronic migraine get better at a younger age?
  • Are there any long-term research studies for migraine?
  • How can I participate in migraine research studies?
  • How should I keep track of migraine triggers when my symptoms are constant?
  • How can migraine triggers become irrelevant?
  • When should someone be hospitalized because of chronic migraine?
  • What percentage of people don’t get better with adequate treatment, and how do I know if I’m one of them?
  • How can some doctors be unaware of chronic migraine, and how can this problem be addressed?

Diagnosing Pressure Headaches vs. CSF Leaks

Deborah Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN

Deborah Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN

Professor of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics and Ophthalmology

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Day 3

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What is cerebral spinal fluid?
  • What are high- and low-pressure headaches?
  • What are the risk factors for high- and low-pressure headaches?
  • What are the symptoms of high-pressure headache (pseudotumor cerebri or idiopathic intracranial hypertension)?
  • What is papilledema and how is it used to diagnose high-pressure headache?
  • What is a spinal tap?
  • How is high-pressure headache treated?
  • What is low-pressure headache (spontaneous intracranial hypotension, or SIH)?
  • Why is low-pressure headache misdiagnosed as chronic migraine?
  • What are the treatments for low pressure, or SIH?
  • What is postural headache?

CGRP and Butterbur: Comparing the Evidence

Pierangelo Geppetti, MD

Pierangelo Geppetti, MD

Professor in the Department of Health Sciences

University of Firenze

Day 5

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • When changes occur, why is it important to keep a record of the number of days with migraine and the use of acute drugs?
  • Why will CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) antibody drugs be important in the treatment of refractory migraine?
  • How is refractory migraine defined?
  • How does incorrect use of onobotulinumtoxinA lead to refractory headache?
  • Is inpatient treatment necessary for the refractory-migraine patient?
  • Why is it so important to be treated by a migraine specialist?
  • How will more physicians be trained to treat migraine patients?

Tension Type Headache vs. Migraine

Lawrence C. Newman, MD

Lawrence C. Newman, MD

Director

NYU Langone Headache Division

Day 2

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How do the diagnostic criteria for migraine differ from those of tension type headache?
  • How are chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache alike?
  • Can a headache start out as a tension-type headache and then transform into a migraine attack?
  • What triggers a tension-type headache?
  • What role does stress play in a tension-type headache?
  • If you have both migraine and tension-type headaches, should you be treated with preventives for both?
  • What are the S.E.E.D.S. of success in headache management?
  • Do triptans work for tension type headache?
  • What are some alternative therapies for tension-type headaches?
  • Are there natural supplements that can help with tension-type headaches?

How to Get the Most from Your Doctor

Patricia Pozo Rosich, MD, PhD

Patricia Pozo Rosich, MD, PhD

Director of the Headache and Neurological Pain Research

Vall d’Hebron University Hospital

Day 1

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How should patients prepare for their doctors’ appointments?
  • What kind of information should patients provide their doctors?
  • What should a patient expect from their doctor?
  • What do doctors expect from their patients?
  • How do expectations differ between the initial appointment and follow ups?
  • How can patients take control of their own health in between appointments?
  • How important is a headache diary?
  • What’s the difference between a good doctor-patient relationship and a bad one? What are some signs of each?

Treatment Spotlight: Ditans and Gepants

Uwe Reuter, MD, PhD, MBA

Uwe Reuter, MD, PhD, MBA

Professor of Neurology

Charité University Hospital of Berlin

Day 6

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What are ditans and gepants?
  • When will these new medications be available?
  • Are they acute or preventive treatments?
  • How will they be administered?
  • How do ditans differ from triptans?
  • How do depants target the CGRP receptor?
  • Which patients are likely to benefit from these new drugs?
  • What side effects do ditans and gepants cause?

When Migraine Disables But Doesn’t Hurt

Shazia Afridi, MD, PhD

Shazia Afridi, MD, PhD

Headache Lead for Neurology

Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Trust, London

Day 3

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What are the two primary types of migraine?
  • Can migraine with aura occur without the head pain?
  • What types of head pain can occur with migraine?
  • Are patients with aura more at risk of stroke?
  • Should women with migraine with aura take estrogen-containing pills for contraception?
  • How can we tell the difference between migraine with aura and a stroke?
  • How soon after an aura begins should the patient take their migraine medications?
  • What are some medications that are used for prevention of migraine with aura?
  • What are some medications for patients with hemiplegic migraine or basilar-type migraine?

Medication for Prevention: Know Your Options

Anna Andreou, PhD

Anna Andreou, PhD

Director of Headache Research

The Headache Centre, GSTT & King's College London

Day 4

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What are the differences between acute therapies and preventive therapies for migraine?
  • How does a physician decide where to start with a patient if it’s determined that they do need some kind of preventive?
  • How can medications developed for other conditions, such as hypertension and epilepsy, be helpful in migraine prevention?
  • What are some of the neuromodulation devices available and how can they help with migraine prevention?
  • How effective has Botox proved to be as a migraine preventive?
  • How do the CGRP treatments — the first drugs specifically developed for migraine prevention — compare to the other “off label” preventive treatments that have been around longer, such as Botox, topiramate and propranolol?
  • Can a combination of pharmaceuticals, neuromodulation devices, and alternative or natural treatments —such as acupuncture, biofeedback, relaxation techniques, and cognitive-behavioral therapy — be a synergistic approach to migraine treatment?
  • How effective are supplements such as magnesium, riboflavin, butterbur, and feverfew in migraine prevention?
  • Is it recommended or even possible to combine two preventive pharmaceuticals, such as Botox and CGRP treatments?
  • How long does a patient  need to be on a particular preventive treatment therapy or approach before they can determine if it’s working?
  • What are some guidelines for prevention therapies based on migraine frequency, whether patients are getting migraine attacks one to three days a month, versus 14 days a month, or somewhere in between?

The Latest on Medical Marijuana for Migraine

Eric Baron, DO

Eric Baron, DO

Staff, Neurological Institute Department of Neurology

Cleveland Clinic

Day 6

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • Why are governments and health regulators changing laws and legalizing marijuana now?
  • What are the legitimate therapeutic or health benefits of cannabis?
  • What obstacles are there to doing research on cannabis, so that we know whether it will work for migraine?
  • If marijuana has a legitimate role in medicine, why has it been illegal for so long?
  • What is cannabis? How is it different or similar to marijuana?
  • What is THC and CBD?
  • What are endocannabinoids?
  • What are common strains of cannabis?
  • How can cannabis address migraine symptoms or comorbidities (nausea/vomiting, etc.)?
  • Which strains or formulations of medical cannabis seem to be the most effective for migraine relief?
  •  

Botox: Separating Fact from Fiction

Andrew Blumenfeld, MD

Andrew Blumenfeld, MD

Director

Headache Center Of Southern California

Day 6

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What exactly is Botox made of and is it dangerous?
  • Is a Botox treatment painful?
  • Are people who are using Botox for chronic migraine also getting cosmetic benefits?
  • What are some possible adverse effects of Botox?
  • How common are adverse side effects from Botox?
  • Should I be concerned about the possibility of “frozen forehead?”
  • If I’m scheduled for a Botox treatment and I am having a severe migraine attack, should I still receive a treatment or wait until after my attack has passed?
  • If you begin showing improvement after receiving Botox, how long should you continue receiving additional treatments?
  • If I don’t see positive effects after the initial round of Botox, should I continue to have additional treatments?
  • Can Botox lead to depression or anxiety?
  • How do you know if your doctor is properly trained in giving Botox injections?

How Posture and Massage Affect Migraine

Mark Braschinsky, MD, PhD

Mark Braschinsky, MD, PhD

Neurologist

Tartu University Hospital

Day 5

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • Is there such a thing as postural headache?
  • Is the neck a trigger or a symptom of migraine?
  • How does tension-type headache compare to cervicogenic headache?
  • What is massage therapy?
  • What is orthopedic massage?
  • Is walking considered an active therapy that can address muscle stiffness?  
  • What is postural correction?
  • Is seeing an osteopath or a chiropractor dangerous?
  • Where can people find active alternatives to help address neck issues?

Neck Pain and Migraine: Trigger or Symptom?

Andrew Charles, MD

Andrew Charles, MD

Director

UCLA Goldberg Migraine Program

Day 4

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How common is neck pain in people with migraine?
  • Which comes first:  neck pain or the migraine attack?
  • Is neck pain a cause of migraine, a symptom of migraine, or both?
  • What is occipital neuralgia and its relationship with migraine?
  • What is the relationship of cervicogenic headache with migraine?
  • Can someone have migraine with neck pain and without head pain?
  • What role can head and neck injuries play in migraine?
  • What precautions should people be aware of with treatments such as chiropractic manipulations?
  • What approaches may be helpful in addressing neck pain symptoms?
  • What role can exercise play in treating neck pain?
  • What does emerging research suggest about the role of C1 nerve root characteristics in migraine?
  • When might neck pain be a sign of something serious other than migraine?

The Keys to Better Emergency Care

Christopher H. Gottschalk, MD, FAHS

Christopher H. Gottschalk, MD, FAHS

Chief, Division of General Neurology

Yale School of Medicine

Day 7

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • Why are headache sufferers sometimes treated as drug seekers in the ER?
  • What steps can headache sufferers take to get better treatment in the ER?
  • What steps can headache sufferers take to reduce the likelihood of going to the ER?
  • What alternatives do headache sufferers have if they don’t want to go to the ER?
  • When is the best time (during a migraine attack) to take a triptan?
  • What is a status migraine and how do you treat it?
  • What is an infusion center?
  • When should you go immediately to an ER?
  • What are the differences between typical migraine aura symptoms and stroke symptoms?

Treating Attacks: Real Patient Case Studies

Rashmi Halker

Rashmi Halker

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Mayo Clinic

Day 7

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How do you develop management strategies for your patients with migraine?
  • What are some common themes across these case studies?
  • Can migraine be managed and controlled?
  • What role does the doctor need to play in migraine management?
  • What role and responsibilities does the patient have in their own migraine management?
  • How do you measure success for acute treatments?
  • How do you measure success for chronic migraine patients?

How to Interpret Migraine Research

Anders Hougaard MD, PhD

Anders Hougaard MD, PhD

Headache Specialist and Researcher

Danish Headache Center, Copenhagen University Hospital

Day 2

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What are the broad types of research conducted in migraine research?  
  • What are the definitions of some of the different terms commonly used in research studies, such as research protocol, study design, double-blind, relative and absolute risk, odds ratio, confidence interval, etc.?
  • What is peer review and why is it used in research so commonly?  
  • What can we do to begin to understand and interpret some of the peer-reviewed research studies that we might find on Google Scholar or PubMed?
  • Often in research studies on migraine, placebo results as high as 25 to 30 percent are reported. How do we make sense of that, and what does that mean?
  • What is research bias and how is it overcome in order to achieve accurate research study results?
  • Why is it important to know the source of funding for a particular research study?
  • What is the structure of a typical research paper?
  • What are some red flags to watch out for when looking at a research paper that could indicate that it’s not a reliable study?
  • Why aren’t there more studies about nonmedicinal methods of managing migraine, like exercise, diet, supplements, and essential oils?

Drug Interactions with Common Migraine Meds

Shivang Joshi, M.D., MPH, RPh

Shivang Joshi, M.D., MPH, RPh

Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy Practice

University of Buffalo School of Pharmacy

Day 4

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What’s the difference between a side effect and an adverse event (or response) to a medication?
  • How common are side effects and adverse events?
  • How are migraine patients at higher risk of medication-related adverse events?
  • What are typical side effects for common migraine medications, such as topiramate, propranolol, valproate, antidepressants, and triptans?
  • What is serotonin syndrome and how do you know if you have it?
  • What are the most common supplements migraine patients take, and what potential side effects do those supplements come with?
  • When should a migraine patient report symptoms of a possible adverse event?
  • What do you do if you’re taking a brand new drug and you think you may be experiencing an adverse event?
  • What’s pharmacogenetics and why is it important for migraine patients?

Clinical Errors that Undermine Migraine Care

Zaza Katsarava, MD, PhD

Zaza Katsarava, MD, PhD

Professor of Neurology

University of Essen, Germany

Day 2

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How can patients and doctors avoid the problems inherent in overly industrialized medicine?
  • Why are treatment rates for people with migraine in Europe so low?
  • What can we do to raise treatment rates?
  • How can patients receive the best possible care from their doctors?
  • What are the direct, indirect, and societal costs of migraine?
  • How much can we improve productivity just by addressing people with migraine who come to work during an attack?
  • What is the most important thing for patients to give their doctors?
  • How does a patient know if they should find a new doctor?

Thriving with Multiple Chronic Illnesses

Nim Lalvani

Nim Lalvani

Executive Director

American Migraine Foundation

Day 8

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • For those who don’t know much about hemiplegic migraine, can you share a bit more about what the signs are that doctors look for to make a hemiplegic migraine diagnosis?
  • There are two main types of hemiplegic migraine — hemiplegic migraine and familial hemiplegic migraine. How are they different?
  • Does genetic testing help people to identify familial hemiplegic migraine?
  • Is it common for someone with hemiplegic migraine to have one of the more common migraine types as well?
  • How did you first get into health-advocacy work, and what was your journey to migraine advocacy in particular?
  • What do you see as the American Migraine Foundation’s biggest challenge — and opportunity?
  • How can people with migraine get involved with AMF?

Sleep, Insomnia and Energy

Christine Lay, MD, FAHS

Christine Lay, MD, FAHS

Associate Professor of Neurology

University of Toronto

Day 1

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • Can poor sleep actually make you more prone to dementia?
  • What does the brain do while we are sleeping?
  • If we miss out on sleep during the week, is it okay to “catch up” on the weekend?
  • Why is sleep especially important for someone who has migraine?
  • What is early morning migraine?
  • What are some things we can do to improve our overall sleep habits?
  • What is ferritin and how does it impact our sleep?
  • Are there foods that can actually help you sleep better?
  • What is migraine recurrence?
  • Can a lack of sleep affect how our medications and treatments are working?

Beware: CGRP Access Challenges Ahead

Kevin Lenaburg

Kevin Lenaburg

Executive Director

CHAMP (Coalition of Headache And Migraine Patients)

Day 8

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • Can you give us an overview of how new drugs are developed and approved by governing bodies?
  • And how does drug development and approval become even more complicated in the United States due to insurance companies?
  • What are the biggest concerns that doctors and patient advocates have about new medications?
  • How would you describe patient expectations for CGRP medications before they were approved?
  • And now that the first few have been approved?
  • What were some of the biggest challenges going on behind the scenes to get CGRP therapies into people’s hands?
  • Can you share a bit more about the programs pharma companies created to make CGRP meds affordable and accessible?
  • What are layered therapies, and why is it hard for patients in the United States to acquire them for migraine treatment?
  • What implications will the AHS white paper issued in Dec 2018 have upon issues of accessibility and affordability of new migraine treatments? Do we expect NHS or IHS to follow suit?
  • What is CHAMP, and how did it come to exist?
  • What are some of the ways people can support CHAMP’s work?

Dodging False Promises and Treatment Claims

Elizabeth Leroux,  MD, FRCPC

Elizabeth Leroux, MD, FRCPC

Headache Clinic Director

Montreal University Health Center

Day 1

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What are some of the migraine treatments tried in ancient times and what do they show us about the pursuit of migraine cures?
  • Why do people with migraine fall victim to quackery and unscientific “cures?”
  • What is pseudoscience?
  • Why is it sometimes difficult to use the scientific method to study the efficacy of a treatment?
  • What is the placebo response and how strong is it?
  • How much should we trust social media reports about treatments?
  • Is cannabis a proven effective treatment for migraine?
  • Is the ketogenic diet safe?
  • What is the best way to evaluate a new treatment?
  • How can the use of alternative treatments lead to our neglect of scientifically proven treatments?
  • What are some evidence-based alternative treatments?
  • Why are nerve blocks used in North America, even though only one of two studies showed that they are effective?
  • Why are some treatments listed in guidelines while others are not?
  • What are the problems with migraine surgeries?

Migraine and Exercise: Trigger or Preventive?

Mattias Linde, MD, PhD

Mattias Linde, MD, PhD

Professor and Consultant Neurologist

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Day 5

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • Do those with migraine tend to exercise more or less than the general population? And how does this change with increasing migraine frequency?
  • Could there be a link or relationship between increasing exercise and decreasing levels of migraine attacks?
  • What physiological benefits does exercise offer to how we sleep, our brain, our stress levels, and our mood?
  • What is exercise? How would you define it?
  • Is all exercise equal? What types are best suited or safest for those with migraine?
  • How much exercise do you need to do to see results? How much exercise based on your research do you think is optimal for patients?
  • Can exercise still be effective for someone who suffers from chronic migraine with a high frequency of attacks?
  • Can exercise as a trigger be managed, and can we handle our warmup differently?
  • Do you have any guidance for those who find that having sex triggers a migraine attack?
  • Who is the ideal migraine patient that would benefit from exercise?

Hormonal Contraception and HRT for Migraine

Anne MacGregor, MD

Anne MacGregor, MD

Professor

Barts and The London School of Medicine & Dentistry

Day 4

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How many women have hormonal migraine?
  • What is the relationship between hormonal migraine and general migraine?
  • Is it possible to effectively manage menstrual migraine?
  • Is there a standard treatment for menstrual migraine or should it be customized to each individual?
  • Why is record-keeping so important to treatment when a woman suspects hormonal migraine?
  • Which hormones are involved in hormonal migraine and how does their involvement impact treatment?
  • How can NSAIDs be used in symptomatic treatment and prevention of menstrual migraine?
  • What role can contraceptives play in treatment of hormonal migraine?
  • Are hormone level measurements helpful in treating menstrual migraine?
  • What is the connection between migraine and other conditions such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, or hypothyroidism?
  • What are the safety considerations related to stopping periods as a treatment for menstrual migraine?
  • What factors affect transgender patients in use of hormonal therapy in migraine treatment?

Hope for Refractory Chronic Migraine

Paolo Martelletti, MD

Paolo Martelletti, MD

Professor & Director, Master of Headache Medicine

Sapienza University of Rome

Day 7

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • When changes occur, why is it important to keep a record of the number of days with migraine and the use of acute drugs?
  • Why will CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) antibody drugs be important in the treatment of refractory migraine?
  • How is refractory migraine defined?
  • How does incorrect use of onobotulinumtoxinA lead to refractory headache?
  • Is inpatient treatment necessary for the refractory-migraine patient?
  • Why is it so important to be treated by a migraine specialist?
  • How will more physicians be trained to treat migraine patients?

Alternative Treatments for Cluster Headache

Brian E. McGeeney, MD, MPH, MBA

Brian E. McGeeney, MD, MPH, MBA

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Boston University School of Medicine

Day 3

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What are the features (or symptoms) of cluster headache?
  • How can we tell the difference between cluster headache and migraine?
  • Why is it called “cluster” headache?
  • What is chronic cluster headache?
  • What are the best ways to treat cluster headache?
  • What commonly prescribed medications generally don’t work well for cluster headache?
  • What kinds of cutting-edge research can we participate in, and how can we register for clinical trials?
  • What are common triggers of cluster headache?
  • What are TACs?

Scans and Tests: Do You Really Need One?

Dimos-Dimitrios Mitsikostas

Dimos-Dimitrios Mitsikostas

Associate Professor of Neurology

Headache Clinic, Athens

Day 2

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What kinds of tests do you think are important for people with migraine to have?
  • How important are patient history and physical examination in diagnosing migraine?
  • What types of tests should be administered for rare subtypes of migraine, like hemiplegic migraine or migraine with prolonged aura
  • When would a person with migraine need a brain scan?
  • Is there any danger in having repeated brain scans?
  • Do people with migraine need to worry about white-matter lesions?
  • If a person with migraine has aura symptoms, does that change the need for testing?
  • What does CFS (cerebral spinal fluid) pressure have to do with migraine?
  • How does an open PFO (patent foramen ovale) valve influence migraine?
  • Why would a person with migraine need an EEG?
  • What are persistent aura symptoms, and are there any tests needed when it is present?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Prevent Migraine?

Angel Moreno, NP

Angel Moreno, NP

Nurse Practitioner

UCLA Goldberg Migraine Program

Day 5

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How important are food triggers of migraine?
  • Is food anxiety misplaced?
  • What is a ketogenic diet?
  • What is ketosis?
  • How do carbohydrates contribute to inflammation in the body?
  • Is there any evidence that low-carbohydrate diets are helpful for migraine?
  • Are ketogenic or low-carbohydrate diets safe and sustainable?
  • How is sugar intake related to migraine?
  • What are some ways of dealing with nausea?
  • What is a recommended diet for migraine?
  • What are some good strategies for staying on a healthy diet?

Beyond Guilt and Shame: One Woman’s Journey

Jaime Sanders

Jaime Sanders

Patient Advocate

TheMigraineDiva.com

Day 8

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • When did your migraine journey begin?
  • As a child, how were you treated after your migraine diagnosis?
  • How did your migraines change throughout the years?
  • What were some of the tools and treatments you initially used after your diagnosis?
  • As a wife and mother, how do you deal with the guilt that comes with not being able to fully function in these roles at times?
  • How did migraine eventually lead to fibromyalgia, depression, and anxiety?
  • What tools have you used to cope with these comorbidities that often come with migraine disease?
  • What have you learned from a naturopath that you wouldn’t necessarily learn from a headache specialist or neurologist?
  • How has using a more holistic, naturopathic approach improved your health?
  • How has working on your own health issues led to your advocacy work, and what are some of the things you’ve accomplished in that area?

Treatment Spotlight: Drug-Free Devices

Amaal Starling, MD

Amaal Starling, MD

Neurologist

Mayo Clinic

Day 6

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What non-invasive neuromodulation devices have been approved by the FDA for treatment of migraine?
  • Are neuromodulation devices safe?
  • Does insurance cover neuromodulation devices?
  • Do you have to have a prescription for neuromodulation devices, and if so, does it have to be from a neurologist or headache specialist or can it be from a primary care provider?
  • Do these devices hurt when you use them?
  • Can they be used for both acute and preventive treatment of migraine?
  • How do I know if I’m a candidate for a neuromodulation device?
  • Can any of these devices be used for cluster headache?
  • Are there any side effects from using these devices?
  • Are there any devices being studied currently that we can hope to see in the near future?

Understanding Balance, Vertigo and Dizziness

Michael T. Teixido, MD

Michael T. Teixido, MD

Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology

Thomas Jefferson Medical College

Day 3

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • Why do some people with migraine experience dizziness or balance issues while others do not?
  • Is it true that you can have migraine without having headache?
  • How is vestibular migraine diagnosed?
  • Why are individuals with vestibular migraine often misdiagnosed?
  • What are some of the symptoms that those with vestibular migraine experience?
  • Do those with vestibular migraine have different triggers than those with migraine in general?
  • What are some of the treatments available for vestibular migraine?
  • Is physical therapy an alternative treatment available for those with vestibular igraine?
  • Is diet something that should be altered when living with vestibular migraine?

Treating Each Phase of a Migraine Attack

Antoinette Maassen van den Brink, PhD

Antoinette Maassen van den Brink, PhD

Associate Professor of Pharmacology

Day 1

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • What is a migraine attack?
  • What is cortical spreading depression, or CSD?
  • What are the known mechanisms behind migraine attacks?
  • Is migraine purely genetic?
  • What is epigenetics?
  • What can you expect from a treatment plan for migraine?
  • What are triptans used for? How many kinds and formats of triptan are there?
  • How do migraine patients respond to different triptans?
  • At what point should a migraine patient consider non-triptan forms of abortive medication or preventative drug treatments?
  • What new treatments for migraine are coming out soon?

Understanding Your Workplace Rights

Stacey Worthy JD

Stacey Worthy JD

Attorney and Executive Director

Aimed Alliance

Day 8

Key Questions

Key Questions

  • How do you fight the stigma that those who suffer with migraine are weak or lazy or even faking it?
  • How does presenteeism come into play with migraine?
  • When is the best time to inform your employer that you suffer with migraine?
  • What is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?
  • Does migraine qualify as a disability under the ADA?
  • How can those with migraine benefit from accommodations in the workplace?
  • If you suffer with migraine, are you allowed to ask your employer for a flexible work schedule?
  • What should you do if your employer is not willing to make accommodations for you in the workplace setting?
  • What is the FMLA and how does it affect migraine in the workplace?
  • Could your employer lay you off if you are missing work because of migraine?

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